The article below describes most common types of Hacker Attacks and provides you the ways you may use in order to protect yourself from being hacked.

Hacker Attack Description Common Defenses
Social Engineering Coaxing passwords and other valuable info from unsuspecting users through innocent conversation. User education, two-factor authentication.
Dictionary Cracking passwords by trying every word in a dictionary. Require strong passwords, limit the number of failure retry attempts, two-factor authentication.
Brute Force Cracking passwords by trying every combination of characters. Require strong passwords, limit the number of failure retry attempts, two-factor authentication.
Replay Network traffic is recorded and replayed later by a hacker after being adjusted to meet their goals. SSL, secure session management, authenticate every application layer, use the RegisterRequiresViewStateEncryption page method, threat modeling.
Bots Software that pretends to be a human Web site user and consumes resources without permission. Turing-test technologies, such as CAPTCHA.
Man-in-the-Middle Phishing, intermediate software that pretends to be a third-party Web Site in order to collect passwords, credit card numbers, etc. SSL, secure session management, authenticate every application layer, use the RegisterRequiresViewStateEncryption page method, threat modeling, user education.
Zero-day exploit A zero-day exploit is where cyber-criminals learn of a vulnerability that has been discovered in certain widely-used software applications and operating systems, and then target organizations who are using that software in order to exploit the vulnerability before a fix becomes available. Typical attack vectors include Web browsers, which are common targets due to their ubiquity, and email attachments that exploit vulnerabilities in the application opening the attachment, or in specific file types such as Word, Excel, PDF or Flash. Be more careful working with different websites, make sure your Web browsers are updated and secured.Do not download or open files from untrusted sources
Business Email Compromise (BEC) A BEC attack is where the attacker targets specific individuals, usually an employee who has the ability to authorize financial transactions, in order to trick them into transferring money into an account controlled by the attacker. BEC attacks usually involve planning and research in order to be effective. For example, any information about the target organization’s executives, employees, customers, business partners and potential business partners, will help the attacker convince the employee into handing over the funds. BEC attacks are one of the most financially damaging forms of cyber-attack. Make sure the email you receive comes from the trusted sender, don’t provide any specific information if your are not sure enough.
Drive-by Attack A ‘drive-by-download’ attack is where an unsuspecting victim visits a website which in turn infects their device with malware. The website in question could be one that is directly controlled by the attacker, or one that has been compromised. In some cases, the malware is served in content such as banners and advertisements. These days exploit kits are available which allow novice hackers to easily setup malicious websites or distribute malicious content through other means. Do not click on suspicious links in the emails you received. You may want to scan the link for potential thread to make sure you are totally safe to open it. Be careful opening websites in the Internet, do not download any files/programs from untrusted sourŅes.